RECENT ACTIVITIES

Read here more on recent activities and research projects. We actively develop new algorithms for remote sensing image interpretation, mass data processing and new information products based on machine learning and AI. We present new research results at conferences and scientific publications.

ALL NEWS

  • News

    We've moved!

    We’ve moved!

    Last week, we were busy moving our offices from Baierbrunn to a new location high above the city of Munich.
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  • News

    Best paper award for RSS and ICIPE at AARSE

    Best paper award for RSS and ICIPE at AARSE

    Last month, RSS and ICIPE collaborated on a paper researching how remote sensing vegetation variables predict the spatial distribution of pests (Trioza erytreae) in Kenya. The publication was presented at the African Association of Remote Sensing of The Environment (AARSE2018) conference this October and won the best paper prize.
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  • News

    Success story of RSS published in “The Ever Growing Use of Copernicus across Europe’s Regions”

    Success story of RSS published in “The Ever Growing Use of Copernicus across Europe’s Regions”

    The publication is a collection of success stories on how Copernicus data meets the concrete needs of regional policy making. The RSS contribution “How Copernicus supports the energy transition“ was selected and included as a success story. The launch of “The Ever Growing Use of Copernicus across Europe’s Regions” at the European Parliament was on November 22nd 2018.
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  • News

    Join us at the COP13!

    Join us at the COP13!

    Meet RSS at the 13th Meeting of the Conference of the Contracting Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands (COP13) which will be held in Dubai, the United Arab Emirates, from 21 to 29 October 2018.
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  • COOPERATION

    DeMo-Wetlands field survey and stakeholder meeting in Rwanda

    DeMo-Wetlands field survey and stakeholder meeting in Rwanda

    The DeMo-Wetlands team traveled to Rwanda this month, meeting with local stakeholders and exchanging the latest advances in geospatial products for wetlands. A field survey was additionally conducted for validating the products.
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  • News

    INDONESIAN PEAT PRIZE ANNOUNCES WINNER OF $1 MILLION

    INDONESIAN PEAT PRIZE ANNOUNCES WINNER OF $1 MILLION

    Today, on the World’s Wetlands Day, Indonesia’s Geospatial Information Agency (BIG) announced that the International Peat Mapping Team, led by Remote Sensing Solutions GmbH (RSS), is the winner of the USD $1 million Indonesian Peat Prize.
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We are very pleased to announce that RSS, as lead of the International Peat Mapping Team, won the Indonesian Peat Prize this morning! The competition aimed to find a new, more accurate and efficient way of mapping tropical peatland extent and thickness, and the Scientific Advisory Board selected our methodology from a number of highly qualified and innovative competitors. The Indonesian government will use our method to protect and manage peatland areas, accelerate peatland restoration and support Indonesia’s development goals. The Indonesian Geospatial Agency BIG will lead the process of using the winning method to improve the current standard for mapping peatland in a scale of 1:50,000, and will start the process by issuing a BIG regulation on peatland mapping.

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TWO-YEAR CONTEST

The contest to find the best methodology to measure the extent and depth of peat in Indonesia drew 44 teams which included some of the biggest names in peat research and mapping. The Prize’s Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), a group of scientists and experts who reviewed the finalists’ submissions, reached a unanimous decision that the International Peat Mapping team produced the most accurate, timely and cost-effective methodology for mapping peatlands.

MAJOR SOURCE OF EMISSIONS

Peat is a major source of carbon dioxide emissions when it burns or decomposes. In 2015, peatlands were responsible for 42% of Indonesia’s total emissions. In the devastating 2015 fire season, forests and peat fires caused 100,000 premature deaths, cost the Indonesian economy $16 billion, and released 1.62 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions, equivalent to the emissions produced by nearly 350,000 cars. The depth, or thickness, of peat soils is an essential measurement; the deeper the peat is, the more ecological damage, including carbon emissions, results from disturbance. Uncertainty around data and information concerning peatland, particularly the depth of peat, has delayed protection and restoration measures for Indonesia’s peatlands, allowing irresponsible parties to continue business as usual, often resulting in drained peat and fires.

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Peat burning

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